Tag Archives: drill rifle

First Overseas DrillMaster Trip

During my 20-year US Air Force Career, I was stationed in three European countries and Japan as well as two states. I had not been to the Middle East or the African continent.  Those two places are now added to the list.

PART I

Matt Pereau and I working with the Jordanian staff
Matt Pereau and I working with the Jordanian staff

Six Months in Planning
Apparently, I have a fan or two overseas. One just happens to live in Qatar and is part of the Police College of Qatar (PCoQ). He contacted the translation staff at the college asking for them to initiate a discussion as to how I could accomplish a significant task for them. The next six months were all about ironing out details and ensuring we were talking about the same thing in two different languages, Arabic and English.

Exhibition Drill Around the World
All one has to do is go to YouTube and see all kinds of videos that highlight drill teams performing exhibition drill. The bulk of videos is going to be of American drill teams, mostly high school JROTC. However, if you keep searching you will see some very interesting exhibition performances from all across Asia, Europe and even a few from the Middle East.

Of the performances outside of the USA, most are made up of a single-file line with some amazing ripple movements (see the Belarus Ripple Line here). That is because the rifles used now (M-16 like) do not facilitate any other effective manipulation or armed exhibition drill that includes tossing rifles around is just not a cultural thing.

After judging all kinds of visual performances since 1986, my view as to a limiting factor for exhibition drill outside America, is the use of what I consider highly ceremonial British-styled (foot) drill. Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate the style and have worked with a Canadian Army Cadets team as well as spent a few hours learning how to march being taught by British Army cadets and staff. I enjoyed learning the style and exchanging good-natured slighting remarks.

You can see this limiting factor that I previously mentioned in videos that display the style. The style does not allow for a consistent horizontal or even vertical flow for an exhibition performance (read about Flow here). As I said, it is very ceremonial in nature, and that is what makes watching the style so mesmerizing at times. For exhibition drill, though, it creates severe performance restrictions. As an example, see these selected videos (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcRniWQELcW4uU89-FEIL4po_e6boF6Up)

So, what is one to do when the prevailing style is British and yet one wants to knock the socks off of everyone with an exhibition drill performance? Teach a new style that is specifically for the performance and this is exactly what the PCoQ training staff was looking for.

Below is the video of the opening ceremonies of the PCoQ. The PCoQ does not have it’s own compound, it is part of the Police Training Institute. The PCoQ’s own compound will be finished some time in 2017.

The cadets here were trained for five weeks before the ceremony by the staff of the PCoQ. Just weeks prior, the cadets were in high school having not marched before. I think they did an outstanding job!

Note: I do not have pictures and video that I can share due to the Qatar Military Secrets Act, I cannot publish anything other than official work from the PCoQ. I’ll have that soon. The pictures and video I have were used for training purposes.

New, New, New!
Now that we established the style that the cadets and staff know by heart, we can see what the three-week training session entailed.

Once established, muscle memory can be difficult to recreate and that is exactly what Matt and I had to do with the 15 staff members, recreate their muscle memory. We worked Standing Manual, teaching the staff to stand with their feet together at the heels and toes, new facing movements and then a new manual of arms with totally different rifles (thank you Joe Rivas of Glendale Paradestore!), not to mention the rifles being quite a bit heavier than what the staff members were used to! We even had classroom time for briefings on how to train, how to write drill and how to judge/develop a critical eye.

Only Three Weeks?
Three weeks is not enough to learn a completely different way of drill, let alone an exhibition routine, but the staff did an amazing job of just that and they learned almost four minutes of the routine! Here is a glimpse of the graduation ceremony performance:

What’s Next?
Much more work, much more. The ultimate performance will be for the first graduation of the PCoQ in 2019. That means a great deal of practice and still more training to come and that means more news to come!

PART II

South Africa is quite a wonderful, hard and difficult country, for me, at least. For seven years Tshepo (“Tse-poh”) Tautshwane and I have known each other through Facebook. He has been very interested in drill and has wanted to start a drill team/(marching band) color guard for his church’s marching band.

Tshepo is the drum major of his band and a student at North West University majoring in music education. He plays tuba extremely well and has a passion to teach others. Below are some pictures of my trip. Top left is my wonderful new family, Lilly, Elizabeth, Nkepile (Tshepo and Elizabeth’s mom), and Natsu. Lilly and Natsu are Tshepo’s Nieces. Christian, who had to run off to school before the picture, is his nephew.

South Africa Trip 2016
South Africa Trip 2016

The bottom right picture is of Tshepo and fellow drum major for another marching band, Motlatsi Moloi. I took six color guard rifles over to help create the new auxiliary for the band. They learned some military manual of arms and also how to spin the rifles.

There is also much more to come from South Africa and the DrillMaster!

Off to Qatar and South Africa!

Yes, it is true! The DrillMaster has been international for years now, but my travels have not taken me outside of the country until today. At 1 pm Eastern, I will fly with my good friend and exhibition drill colleague, Matthew Pereau. We are truly excited and blessed for this opportunity!

Leaving for Qatar
Matt and me this morning ready to leave for the airport!

 

 

 

Our first stop is Qatar where we will train a group for three weeks. Matt will fly back home and I will continue on for four days in Johannesburg, South Africa. I will publish the many details about the trip complete with video and pictures upon my return.

Godspeed everyone!

The Summer of Drill!

drill team training, honor guard training
The Summer of George!

If George Costanza (from the TV series Seinfeld) can have “The Summer of George!” Then those of us in the military drill world can have The Summer of Drill! Every summer! But our summers will be filled with training and performances!

Each summer, I am heavily engaged with the Cadet Joint Service Honor Guard Academy in Flemingsburg, Kentucky at the National Cadet Training Center at Camp Sousley, training cadets at drill camps, and working with first responders teaching Honor Guard Ceremonial Unit Academies across the country. I even travel internationally, at times, writing and teaching exhibition drill.

Competitions: Solo exhibition drill competitions are just about everywhere. Seek and you will find. If you would like to advertise your competition on this website contact me!

If you contact me, please be patient as I will be working long, thoroughly enjoyable days. I will get back to you as soon as I can!

Article Links

My best advice? Read, read, read, read, read. Knowledge is key!

Drill Teams

Honor Guard/Ceremonial Teams

Color Guards

POW/MIA Flag and Ceremony

American Flag

DrillMasterTraining  and DrillMaster YouTube Channels

drill team training, drill team motivation, drill instructor, drill camp, drill academy, honor guard training, honor guard academy

All About Posting or Presenting Colors

Honor Guard Color Guard at PortThere is quite a bit of information and several situations that every color team needs to know to maintain the American flag in the position of honor – on the marching right or in front. The American flag never marches any other position. Never. Military and para-military (just about every organization that has it’s members in uniform) should follow military guidance and never march the American flag in the center. The position of honor is to the right- not the center.

Color Guard- No Way

What Flags do we Carry and in what Order?

Joint Colors

Military, Civil and Citizen teams have different requirements. The colors listed are in order from the marching right (viewer’s left):

  • Military teams (the US military, ROTC, and JROTC, and other cadet organizations) carry the American, (state,) and service colors. The organizational color would be last.
  • Civil teams (law enforcement, firefighters, and EMS) carry the American, state, municipal, organizational and even fraternal colors. The fraternal color can be omitted when presenting for loval government functions.
  • Citizen teams (Scouts, fraternal organizations) carry the American, state, and organizational colors.
    • Tribal teams , on Tribal lands, would carry the Tribal Nation’s color, American, and state colors. Outside of Tribal lands, the American would be first and then the Tribal Nation’s color. Some Tribal teams also carry service colors.

Side note: If a military color team is going to carry the following colors, this is the order. No exceptions.

  1. American flag
  2. State flag
  3. Military service flag

Carrying more than one national flag?

Let’s say you are part of an Emerald Society Pipe and Drum Corps and Honor Guard(a first responder fraternity). Many of these teams carry not only the American flag, but also the Irish flag. Why? The first cops and firefighters were Irish. The tradition continues. Back to our situation of two national flags: All national flags are treated the same on American soil – they are never dipped in salute. Ever. Both remain upright even during both national anthems, if they are played. All other colors dip in salute.

Joint Service Order for Military Colors

This is the only order for service flags, service emblems, etc. For more information on why this is the order, click here to read Joint Service Order of the Colors. The right/lead rifle guard is a Soldier and the left/rear guard is a Marine.

  1. Army
  2. Marine Corps
  3. Navy
  4. Air Force
  5. Coast Guard

Note: While service color position remains the same, if all service personnel are not able to be present for the team, their order should go as follows as far as knowledge is concerned: regardless of service or rank, the most knowledgeable (as far as color guard experience) member should be the US color bearer and the second most knowledgeable should be the right rifle guard. Third in this sequence should be the left rifle guard with descending familiarity following from there.

Joint Service Order for First Responders

Full disclosure: I developed this. While this is not a hard-and-fast rule, I thought it necessary to create an order of precedence based on the implementation of each service. From my limited research, I came up with the following:

  1. Law enforcement officer (LEO)
  2. Fire
  3. EMS

Using the guidance from the military, team make up might look like this:

  1. Right/lead rifle guard: LEO armed with a rifle/shotgun, second-most experienced member
  2. American flag: LEO, most experienced member
  3. Other flag (State, etc.): Firefighter/EMS, can be least in experience
  4. Left/rear guard: Firefighter/EMS armed with a ceremonial fire axe, third in experience

Keep in mind the guidance that the most experienced member should be the US color bearer, regardless of service/profession.

LEO/Fire Working Together

I encourage and enjoy joint work, but there is an issue that must be addressed: Technique.

Does Height Matter?

Experience before aesthetics. Not if you have the luxury of each member of the team being around the same height, but for cadet and civil teams, it should come second to knowledge and experience. Yes, the team might look “off”, but it’s best to have knowledgeable members of the team in key positions rather than have aesthetics. Click here and read this article.

Flag Stuck, etc.?

Problem during the Performance? That’s why God invented the right and left guards for the team! The guards are there to fix whatever issue they can. For more, read this article here.

Hangin’ Around

Waiting for the ceremony still requires proper protocol.

  1. Arrive at the site at least one hour early
  2. Practice while in your travel uniform (this ensures no one thinks the ceremony has already begun and gives the team time to figure out their movements)
  3. Change into ceremonial/Class A uniform
  4. Hang out* with equipment ready in-hand and all team members in their proper place (American flag at right or in front of other flags- yes, even just hanging around – cameras are everywhere)
  5. Ten minutes prior to show time, line up at staging position at Stand at Ease (or Parade Rest) ready to perform

*An example of how NOT to hand around. This is a USAF Base Honor Guard team, I have pictures of other services, this is just an example.

base honor guard, color team, color guard, honor guard training
A USAF Base Honor Guard Color Team

Parades

Left Wheel, Right Wheel and About Wheel. These are terms that honor guards use to describe turns accomplished by the color team most often outside. Right/Left Wheels use the center of the team as the rotation point which means half the team marches forward and the other half marches backward to rotate the team 90-degrees in an average of eight steps for teams with four to six members. The team executes the About Wheel in the same direction as the Right Wheel rotating the team 180-degrees in 16 steps.

Color Guard Wheel JPEG Color Guard MC Left About

Posting/Presenting

While colors can be and sometimes are posted outdoors, my experience leads me to recommend that you present and not post. The wind just never plays well with other others. We, in the military try to avoid this as much as possible with the alternative being a color team that posts near the podium for the event. The members present and then stage the team for everyone to see. Sometimes this may not be a viable solution and you will have to have the event and location dictate how the color team handles the colors. See also, How to Present the Colors at an EventWhat is Authorized when Presenting the Colors, and How to Plan and Coordinate a Color Guard Event. This article, How to Present the Colors at an Event, has great information.

Note: As a rule of thumb, colors enter at Right Shoulder (Carry) and depart at Port Arms. Entering at Port is fine if necessary.

  1. Enter
  2. Halt in front of and facing audience
  3. Present Arms for National Anthem or Pledge (never both)
  4. Port Arms
  5. (Color bearers move to post colors and rejoin guards)
  6. Depart

Standard entrance and departure.

Colors Posting Process

To Present or Post, that is the Question!

Posting the colors is for special occasions. How special? That is up to the organization. Graduations are a special time, that would call for posting the colors. Weekly events would probably warrant pre-posted colors at the least or presenting the colors only.

The Show-n-Go. This is the honor guard term for presenting the colors for an informal/semi-formal event. The colors are pre-posted on the stage/front of the room and the color team enters, presents (Anthem), and then departs. No posting.

With the Show-n-Go, the colors do not matter. As long as the American flag pre-posted, the color team can present whatever they carry as their standard colors (American, State, etc.).

How to Enter

The standard entrance is to enter from the viewer’s right, present to the audience (then post) and depart. See the image above.

To enter from the viewer’s left, use Every Left On. Also, read this article.

Every Left On

How to Exit

The standard exit is to the viewer’s left. See the standard entrance/departure image above.

To exit to the viewer’s right, use Every Left Off. The commander calls, “Step!” and the left rifle guard steps across, as close as possible to the team member on their left. Step any further away and the departure for the team looks terrible.

Color Guard Left Exit

When to Retire/Retrieve the Colors

Retrieving the colors is reserved for the extra, extra formal occasions. Use the posting sequence in reverse.

  1. Enter
  2. Halt in front of and facing audience
  3. Color bearers retrieve colors and rejoin guards
  4. Present Arms for a few seconds
  5. Port Arms
  6. Depart

The Obstacles of a Parade

from pitch.com
from pitch.com

When I was in AFJROTC (’70-’83), we didn’t have scoopers right behind horse entries in a parade. They were the unsung heroes who brought up the very rear, just in front of the police car with the flashing lights signaling the end of the parade. This meant that everyone in the parade had to dodge, duck, dip, dive and… dodge certain remnants from our equine parade entries.

30 JUNE 2012 - PRESCOTT, AZ: "Pooper Scoopers" pick up horse dung during the Prescott Frontier Days Rodeo Parade. The pooper scoopers are among the most popular people in any parade that features lots of horses, and lots of horses march in the Prescott parade. The parade is marking its 125th year. It is one of the largest 4th of July Parades in Arizona. Prescott, about 100 miles north of Phoenix, was the first territorial capital of Arizona. PHOTO BY JACK KURTZ
30 JUNE 2012 – PRESCOTT, AZ: “Pooper Scoopers” pick up horse dung during the Prescott Frontier Days Rodeo Parade. The pooper scoopers are among the most popular people in any parade that features lots of horses, and lots of horses march in the Prescott parade. The parade is marking its 125th year. It is one of the largest 4th of July Parades in Arizona. Prescott, about 100 miles north of Phoenix, was the first territorial capital of Arizona. PHOTO BY JACK KURTZ

Now, scooper are placed throughout parades and are making a crummy job fun.

there should be people, sometimes Scouts, who clean up during the parade walking behind horse entries in parades. However, there is the possibility of encountering one or more situations where you and your team may need to either March through or around an obstacle. The choice is yours. Manure won’t ruin shoes, but it’s not nice stepping in it and carrying a certain amount down the road with you especially when you are in front of the public, the whole parade is your performance. But, that’s what we do: adapt overcome and carry on. On the other hand, the team always has the option of separating and individually moving around obstacles and then coming back together. That movement should be as slight as possible – no major movements.

Shaving, a Bane of Existence

from coachrickswimming.com
from coachrickswimming.com

The first time one shaves is the beginning of a never-ending cycle when you wear a service uniform. Say hello to nicks, cuts and the occasional abrasion depending on your skin type and especially if you have acne.

There are shaving powders, creams, and soaps, but probably the best shave you will find is from oil. You can buy a relatively expensive specific blend of oils that create a better shaving experience, or, you can go into the kitchen and pour a little olive oil into a small bottle and use that. Olive and hemp oils (what I use) are great for shaving because oil protects your skin better as you run that steel blade across your skin and these oils do not block your pores which is even better. Using an oil is less expensive and healthier for you by avoiding the chemicals that can be in the soaps and creams. Here is how to implement oil in your shaving regimen.

Best in the shower: get your (face) skin nice and wet, wash your hair and then turn off the water (a cut-off valve is great). Now, put about six to ten drops of oil on your fingers and massage it over the area to shave. Put water on your razor and get your fingers wet on your non-shaving hand. Put this water on the first area to shave; you now have three layers of liquid on your face: water-oil-water. Shave the area that you just wet. Rinse the razor OFTEN. Here is an example:

Wet fingers, rub that water on your right cheek, shave right cheek with a downward motion of the razor, turn your water on so that it is forceful and rinse your razor, wet your fingers again and repeat for the next area to shave.

from telegraph.co.uk
from telegraph.co.uk

When you rinse your razor, the water must be quite forceful since the oil and stubble are a little sticky and messy. If you need to re-shave a portion of skin, add more water to that area, don’t just shave it again. The floor of your shower might become a little slippery, that is why you shave toward the beginning of your shower and then let the soap during the rest of your shower take care of the floor, to some degree.

Which direction to shave? Great question and only you can decide that. If you have very sensitive skin, shaving closely will irritate and possibly make your skin bleed with dozens of little red dot all over. Shaving against the growth of hair (“against the grain”) is the best way to get as close as possible. Shaving with the direction of hair is close, but the least irritating. Shaving sideways to hair growth produces in-between results.

Key points: no matter what you shave or how: use copious amounts of water, a little oil- add more oil if necessary, and more water. Rinse your razor constantly.

Ears, Eyebrows, and Nose
Guys, you will probably end up trimming all three of these at one time or another. It’s just part of getting older. However, trim them you must! You need to be as professional as possible and this is part of it.

Safety razor, straight razor, electric shaver, or hybrid (electrical wet shaver): It is up to personal choice. Try different methods and see what is best for your lifestyle and skin.

Speaking of oil
Get some coconut oil and oil pull for 15 to 20 minutes first thing each morning with a large teaspoon of the stuff. It will be extremely beneficial for you.

Communication and Respect

In the movie, Ghost Busters, Egon Spengler says, “Print is dead.” To some extent, I agree, but words on the screen are alive and well.

Sgt. Stephanie L. Peavy of Machesney Park, Ill., and Spec. John G. Matsoukas of Chicago, both members of the 244th Army Liaison Team based in Chicago, tests the capability of an operating system being tested by the U.S. military for possible fielding of new equipment during an annual training exercise called Coalition Warrior Interoperability Demonstration. CWID 2011 spans five U.S. locations and more than 20 coalition partners worldwide. The participating technologies were approved based on how well they address capability gaps and evaluates how well they assists in the exchange of information between coalition partners, military services, government agencies, first responders and U.S. combatant commanders.

In the military, we know how to communicate and how to show respect in all forms of communication. After all, the military relies heavily on communication and it must be done the right way the first time, every time.

Social media has literally destroyed communication while creating an overabundance of it. It is just words on a screen and anyone can write anything they want and send it to anyone or even everyone. No longer, are people dealing directly with other people, it is now through a screen and many are so flippant, they spew their vile hate-filled words at its worst. I’m not talking about the idiotically-defined “hate”, which can be anything that “offends”, I’m talking about the incessant use of swear words thrown around with ease or, at the least, just the complete lack of respect shown to others regardless of who they are. I am not calling for a “sir-sandwich” with every comment, but to rip into someone online is just inexcusable.

Using a 45-year old adult named Alfred as the subject, if you, a high school student, follow of one of Alfred’s social media accounts, even though the social network says that you both are “friends”, you most certainly are not. You are not even acquaintances unless you have met in person. Even if you are in your 20s, address other adults by their last name or Sir/Ma’am. If you know Alfred by his rank, then that is how you address him- that is how you address everyone unless otherwise specified. I know many veterans, retirees, law enforcement, EMS and firefighters. Some of them I address by their rank- I have never asked nor have they said otherwise, and some of them I call by their first name. However, I always begin by using rank, last name or sir/ma’am. It is best to begin with respect and communicate that you think the other person deserves respect.

A soft answer turneth away wrath: but grievous words stir up anger.

Proverbs

You must start at a mutual basis; everyone deserves respect, regardless if you are given respect or not. I see some online accounts with a statement that goes something like this: ‘Treat me well and I will treat you well.’ It does not work that way. Sure, you can treat someone else like they are just a piece of garbage just because they did not respect you first, but that is just a big cop-out. We all have a responsibility to treat others with respect, regardless of how others treat you. Do you not like that you have a responsibility to others? That is the reality of life, even though others do not live up to that responsibility. It has to start with someone, who better than you?

warrior-sitting-bull

“Guard, Fix the Flag”

JROTC Colors savananow-comIt’s a windy day. Your JROTC color guard is up next for the competition. You move into position on the drill, colors at Carry and rifles at Right Shoulder, pad and give the order to go to Present Arms. The rifles guards execute the Present Arms position, the American flag is flying in the breeze, and the spade at the top of the staff for the state flag, while it is being pushed forward, catches the American flag at the corner and the flag wraps around the point on the spade. If you notice in time, you realize that if either of the flags move independently, the American flag, made of nylon, will have a nice rip, or at least, a run that will render the flag useless, requiring the purchase of a new flag. What should happen next?

Fix it! The color team commander, the bearer of the American flag (only, no one else is ever the commander), must give an informational command to have the right or left rifle guard proceed to fix it. If need be, bring the staffs out of the harness cup/socket, proceed with whatever needs to be fixed and then carry on with the performance like nothing happened. The impression left on the judge/audience will be much better then if a disaster is left to happen.

You have been trained to execute the sequence and, just like exhibition Drillers who must practice on how to recover from a drop or hit, your team should make sure they are prepared to handle a mishap or accident without breaking their bearing. Handle it in a professional manner and everyone will remember your stellar performance.

Judges! Do not fix anything that the cadets can handle! Let them learn. They need to be able to adapt and overcome and if they do or do not, score accordingly.

How to Create and Teach Drill Team Ripples

The “domino effect” does not accurately describe what we call a ripple in exhibition drill. Dominos fall and that’s it. Yes, it’s a ripple, but nothing else happens. Not very effective for a drill team.

This video is a great illustration of the domino effect, using books.

[embedplusvideo height=”296″ width=”474″ editlink=”http://bit.ly/1OUINOO” standard=”http://www.youtube.com/v/WWUPA-xUsFo?fs=1″ vars=”ytid=WWUPA-xUsFo&width=474&height=296&start=&stop=&rs=w&hd=0&autoplay=0&react=1&chapters=&notes=” id=”ep1981″ /]

However, we are talking about a ripple for a military drill team.

What is a ripple?

For military drill purposes, it is an action that begins at one point and is then repeated along a line of Drillers to another point or points.

Are there Different kinds?

Not necessarily, but variation in a ripple line is very effective. These variations are

  1. Left to Right
  2. Right-to-Left
  3. Center outward (starting at the center and moving out to both ends)
  4. Out-inward (starting at both ends going to the center)
  5. Slow-to-Fast (gradual and immediate)
  6. Fast-to-Slow (gradual and immediate)

How does one go about teaching a team to perform a ripple?

To begin, use a metronome and go slowly. Use a metronome application on your phone, set it to 2/4 (for a tick-tock, high-low, type of beat) and set a slow tempo around 90 BPM (beats per minute). If you need to set it slower, that is not a problem; make sure that everyone is comfortable with the speed, you can always increase it as everyone improves.

The slower tempo allows everyone to begin on a tick or a tock and ensures a solid timing framework from which you can then increase the tempo. Using the metronome is only for creating timing. It is almost impossible to get the metronome going fast and have everyone follow it.Once the team can build speed into the ripple, leave out the metronome and visually get your cue on when to move.

Once the team can build speed into the ripple, leave out the metronome and visually get your cue on when to move. Here is an example: the person to my right (A) is going to go to Right Shoulder and I (B) am going to repeat it and then the person to my left (C) will do the same in a ripple. When A goes to Port, that is my cue to do the same which is C’s cue to move. We all then finish executing Right Shoulder as slowly or as quickly as needed.

When you want a very fast tempo in your ripple, using the analogy above of executing Right Shoulder, instead of waiting for the person to execute Port, my cue will be A’s initial movement of the rifle.

The Combined Drill Teams of the Belarus Military

[embedplusvideo height=”385″ width=”474″ editlink=”http://bit.ly/22Hqq9W” standard=”http://www.youtube.com/v/sbfKubcdZEA?fs=1″ vars=”ytid=sbfKubcdZEA&width=474&height=385&start=&stop=&rs=w&hd=0&autoplay=0&react=1&chapters=&notes=” id=”ep3910″ /]

The Ross Volunteers of Texas A&M University

[embedplusvideo height=”296″ width=”474″ editlink=”http://bit.ly/22HqBSS” standard=”http://www.youtube.com/v/QQqk4-w9bGQ?fs=1″ vars=”ytid=QQqk4-w9bGQ&width=474&height=296&start=&stop=&rs=w&hd=0&autoplay=0&react=1&chapters=&notes=” id=”ep9784″ /]

Firing Party: Stop Taking Aim!

The Nellis AFB Honor Guard Firing Party
The Nellis AFB Honor Guard Firing Party

A Firing Party fires a ceremonial Three-Volley salute using modern or traditional rifles (military), shotguns, or pistols (law enforcement). It is not the 21-Gun Salute, that is fired by guns (canons) and only in the Army and Navy.

Members of the Navy Ceremonial Guard fire a 17-gun salute in honor of Vice Adm. Robin R. Braun during the Chief of Navy Reserve, Commander, Navy Reserve Force change of command at the Washington Navy Yard.
Members of the Navy Ceremonial Guard fire a 17-gun salute in honor of Vice Adm. Robin R. Braun during the Chief of Navy Reserve, Commander, Navy Reserve Force change of command at the Washington Navy Yard.

The Numbers: Anywhere from three to seven members firing with a commander. The smaller amount of members on the team does not mean that more shots are fired.

www.dps.alaska.gov
www.dps.alaska.gov Alaska State Troopers with the M16

The Rifles: Traditional rifles are the M1 Garand and, used most often, the M14. The reason for these two rifles being used is the charging handle. The M1903 has a bolt and is awkward to operate smoothly when loading each round. Modern rifles are the M16 and variations of it. Pump action shotguns provide a similar action as the M1 and M14 when loading the rounds.

 

A firing party from Co. C, BSTB, 2nd ABCT, 1st Inf. Army photo
A firing party from Co. C, BSTB, 2nd ABCT, 1st Inf. Army photo

The Stance: Neds to be solid. Do not bend at the waist and do not bend your knees. You can see both of these in the Soldiers in the picture below.

 

“Fires” is the keyword in the first paragraph. The team fires the Salute, it does not “shoot”. Shooting requires taking aim to hit your target. The Firing party does not have a target, it is firing blanks for the Salute and not going to hit anything.

duboiscountyfreepress.com The Indiana State Police Jasper Post Firing Party.
duboiscountyfreepress.com The Indiana State Police Jasper Post Firing Party.

While this is a non-standard stance for the Indiana State Police, you can see their use of shotguns for the team.

Army Firing Party
The Old Guard Firing Party at Arlington National Cemetery

I understand the natural position of taking aim when having a rifle or shotgun in your hands a getting ready to fire the weapon. However, training must involve breaking this habit. It’s a ceremony and must be treated as such. There is a time to take aim and shoot and a time to fire. “Ready, Aim, FIRE!”

www.riley.army.mil A seven-man firing party conducts a rifle volley during a ceremony
www.riley.army.mil A seven-man firing party conducts a rifle volley during a ceremony

In the picture above, you can see how some of these Soldiers are taking aim while using a more modern rifle to fire the volleys.