Tag Archives: jrotc

Create Goals, not Dreams

A speedometer with red needle pointing to Reach Goal, encouraging people to get motivatedBut not just goals, SMART Goals
The difference between a goal and a SMART goal is your goals need to be Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-bound. SMART goals give you a much better avenue to reach your goals. Your dreams are the fuel that drives the high-performance goal engine.

Specific
Broad, general terms are not going to help. What, specifically, do you want to accomplish? “I want to be a better Driller”, is too broad. “I want to improve my footwork”, is much more solid and descriptive.

Measurable
How will you know how much you have improved? What will you use as your scale to determine your improvement? It is just fine to use a professional to give you feedback and rely on that as your tool for measurement.

Attainable
“I want to my footwork to be just like a professional tap dancer.” Probably not going to happen by your next competition or over the summer. Small steps are just fine.

Relevant
Does your goal strictly pertain to what you want? Make sure.

Time-bound
“A year from now, I want to be able to…” While a year is not an impossible timeline, it is quite a long time and there is a great possibility that you will get distracted. “In the next three hours I want to…” is also not impossible, but we need to find a happy medium. Give yourself a week or two, or even a month or six.

While we are on the subject:

Write it down
Successful people say it all the time, “Put it in writing.” In the Air Force I also learned, “If it isn’t written down, it never happened.” While professionally we may do this, sometimes we may overlook applying this to our personal lives. Goals in writing become real, it’s like making a contract with yourself. The contract then requires discipline on your part.

Sacrifice now for great dividends later
Practice, read and study. My articles and books and your service drill and ceremonies manual need to be at the top of your reading list. Wake up early to practice on your own. Carry the command list for the unarmed squad you will command for this year’s competitions. Read it when you are waiting in line. Put a copy of it up in your bathroom and read it three times while you brush your teeth.

Remind yourself why
People who are truly successful never let short-term pain override long-term goals. They know that the only difference between success and failure is where on the timeline they decide to quit. Even so, they constantly remind themselves of “why” they are doing what they do. Find an image that represents your goals and put it everywhere: your computer screensaver, refrigerator door, office desk and your bathroom wall at home. Think it, say it and repeat it. Never forget “WHY.”

While you may not have the power to predict and control the future, you most certainly have the power to shape and guide your future as you see fit. By following these six steps, you can begin to build your new future today, and take positive steps to make 2015 your most awesome year on record.

 

Follow The DrillMaster on Periscope!

I teach in various locations around the United States of America and with the advent of Periscope, the application for smart phones, I can now share live training moments when working with law enforcement, firefighters, EMS and cadets!

Download the free app from your phone’s store and start watching. Broadcasts begin the first week of August 2015 at the Cadet Joint Service Honor Guard Academy!

DrillMaster Periscope

The Terror of the Dropped Rifle

See these related articles: How Drops Affect Scoring & Learning to Drop.

woman-screamingSalute!
Imagine this: you are a judge at a JROTC competition assigned to judge one of the exhibition drill categories. During a performance, a cadet drops his rifle, comes to attention, salutes the rifle, picks it up and continues on with the performance. The “Face-Palm” action would be inappropriate in this situation.

Saluting a dropped rifle has to be one of my biggest pet peeves. There is no reason for it and, to me, makes the Driller look less than intelligent.

It was started decades ago as a way to make a cadet who dropped, look silly. The embarrassment was meant to help you not drop- which it never did. It’s absolutely ridiculous to salute a dropped rifle. When you do, you are telling everyone, “Hey, I just dropped the rifle and I’m not going to try to minimize the effect that the drop has on my performance. I’m going to look stupid and salute an inanimate object.”

IMG_2386What if (see the picture at right) the cadet picks up the rifle, brings it to the Order position and brings his left hand across for a salute? No, this isn’t any good either! This is not a salute for the rifle it is a salute that the Marine Corps and Navy still execute when at Order. It is one of three different salutes rendered between individuals when at Order or either Shoulder position. The Army ceased performing these salutes many years ago.

“Mutual respect”
Between the rifle and the Driller. [Buzzer sound] Wrong- thanks for playing! Respect is between people, respect from a rifle is impossible.

You will not find any kind of guidance like what you have read here in any military manual. Yes, you will be taught to fully respect your equipment, including your rifle, when in the military- that is a must. Your life and the lives of others depends on how well you take care of your equipment at personal and unit level. That is a completely different context, one that is not applicable to JROTC. After all the rifle with which you drill will not save your life- even if it is a Demil.

Lastly, it doesn’t matter whether you are practicing or performing, never salute a dropped rifle.

How to Teach Exhibition Drill

You may not “know the drill”…

If you have my books, Exhibition Drill for the Military Drill Team, Vols I & II, you probably have an idea of the process of writing drill, (here is a simple “Boxes of Three” method for creating drill) but might not understand the application of taking what has been written on a DrillMaster Routine Mapping Tool (RMT, available for download here)  and then having your team actually march what was designed. The key to this is the grid that I developed and put on each of the RMTs. This helps us translate what is on paper to what is on the drill deck.

How to Write Drill

Read Here to learn the Eight Things Every Driller Needs.

Cones for Drill (2)Cones

Painting a giant grid on a parking lot at your school is not necessary, but you can do it. It is just as easy to create the, in this case platoon/flight, drill deck by using cones. When I teach, I use small cones that are designed for sports and if they get stepped on or run over, they just pop right up.

On the Drill Team (100′ X 100′) RMT, there are numbers across the bottom of the grid (1-20) and letters going up the left side (A-U). You will want to identify your cones with the same numbers and letters. You can use cones that are all the same color or, you can color-code certain areas of the drill pad to show where the “Power Section”.

Lay out your cones in a large L-shape. If you choose to use the color coding, you can lay the cones out like in this picture, below. The red ones on the side are a little difficult to see and I did not lay out all of the cones, but this is the general idea.

Cones for Drill (1)

Before the team goes out onto your practice area with the new cones laid out, go over the routine’s drill sets (each page is called a “set”) with the team so they have a general familiarity of what is happening. Now, go to the field and begin setting the team up to enter (read this article about The Seven Parts of an Exhibition Drill Routine).

Once at the entrance, being to set everyone up in their positions of the first set, march it a couple times. If an armed team, learn the drill unarmed first, then add the equipment (rifle, guidon, sword/saber). If unarmed, learn the drill first and add the body work (hand, arm, head torso, leg and foot work). If only the drill is written and the equipment/body work needs to be added to each page, as you create the equipment work, write it down.

Continue to learn each set learning the drill first, and then layering over it body movement and/or equipment

Are you a soloist, tandem, squad/element? The same applies to you.

How to Create a Tetrad (Four-Man Team) Exhibition Performance

The Tetrad
Drill teams come in all sizes for different reasons. Teams can range in size from nine to twenty five members with or without a commander marching outside of the formation. A tetrad, the shorter name for a four- or five-man exhibition drill team, creates a performance for small areas like a ballroom dance floor or on a stage.

Why a tetrad?
If your unit already has an unarmed, armed, one or more tandem (two Drillers) and soloists, why have yet another team especially if the team cannot compete (no category at local meets)? The answer is that the tetrad team is the perfect “portable” size. Does your school visit the local elementary and middle schools and perform for the students? You should. You need to advertise JROTC and give younger children an opportunity to see

There are specifics that a tetrad can follow for competitions (click here) or the team can design a routine that is specifically for entertaining an audience during a formal dinner.

The following diagrams are an example of what a tetrad can do. It will give you an idea of what your team may want to do.

The Progression of a Tetrad performance
You can use the following description or modify it to suit your needs.

1. The Entrance

If your team has five members (the fifth is the commander, usually armed with a sword/saber), the commander to enter at the head of the team, or even before the team, with the team following as soon as the commander posts at his/her spot.

You will probably want the team to enter and encircle the commander. The whole team would then look like the 5-side of a die, like this.

Tetrad 1

You may want to have your team enter so that they are all facing center like this.

Tetrad 2

2. Close-in Drill

Here the team’s rifle movements need to be very conservative since you are in close quarters. Rifle movement should be constrained to spinning and short exchanges (Port, Leaning, etc.)

Note: Numbers two and three can be reversed, starting farther away from the commander and then stepping in closer.

3. The Step Back

Now, the team can be a little more open to rifle movement with more exaggerated spins, tosses and bigger exchanges (Shoulder, Ground, etc.).

Tetrad 3

4. If you have room…

You can depart from the usual formation and work into and from a single-file line (column) like this.

Tetrad 4

5. Introductions

Prior to leaving, whether you execute number 4 or not, it’s a good idea to come forward in a single-file line for individual introductions. With the introductions, each member, commander last, can step forward, perform a “signature move” and then step back into line.

Tetrad 5

6. The Departure

The team can face toward their exit point and march off without performing anything else, or they can give the audience one last team move to wow the crowd and leave them wanting more.

Resistance to Change: Betrayal?

DSC_0443_963x2559I felt the need to follow up the article that published last week, Resistance to Change: The Five Monkeys Syndrome.

My help is sought out on a consistent basis from high school and college drill teams and also first responder honor guard units. I teach courses and, when asked, also give free advice over the phone, through email or on videos on any subject in the Military Drill World.

The picture at right is from my book, The Honor Guard Manual, I purposefully did not wear gloves for the pictures so that readers could see the exact positioning of my hands and fingers.

I also give advice to many others even when they don’t ask. Those results are 80%-20%. The 80% is people receive the advice in a positive manner, the 20% is the opposite. I don’t know if those numbers are exact, I haven’t accomplished a scientific study, it’s a guess, really- most people do receive the advice very well and sometimes it leads to a great conversation and then…

Not long ago, I had a brief conversation on one of my social media accounts with an individual. He was nice enough but presented the argument of, “We like the way we do what we do.” It was a small issue really, but one that I felt needed to be fleshed out, I don’t want anyone in the honor guard community to not look as professional as possible.

How the conversation went:

Indiv: So, we need to change just because you say so?

DM: No, not at all, just want you to be as professional as possible.

Indiv: That’s your opinion.

DM: That’s right and it is based on over 25 years of experience.

Indiv: There is more than one way to render honors.

DM: True and sometimes there is a better way.

Indiv: There is a nice way to approach it.

DM: And what way would that be? Advice can be seen as an attack. People are trained a certain way and feel it is best. Another says there is a better, sharper way and the person feels if he changes or even agrees he is betraying his trainers.

A national standard did not exist for first responder honor guard units until I published my book, The Honor Guard Manual, in 2011. Who am I to establish a national standard? I am just a guy who saw the need, that’s all. No one is forced to adopt every single movement described in the manual; the manual is there for use and if a team chooses to use all, some or none of it, that is completely up to them, it doesn’t bother me. I will always make suggestions, however, and whether those suggestions are adopted or not, is not my concern.

Besides the, “Well, that’s the way we have always done it” mentality, a sense of betrayal is why some changes will never be made, for the better in my opinion, for some teams. And that’s too bad.

Resistance to Change: The Five Monkeys Syndrome

stages_of_resistance_to_change1Even if you are a cadet in high school JROTC or in Sea Cadet, Young Marines, etc. you may have come across this syndrome. If you are an adult, you most definitely have come across this. Please watch this short video before reading on and it will explain. Image courtesy of Sharon Browning and Associates.

Now, we are not talking about “Change for change’s sake” that’s just plain useless. Many organizations have tools in place for use by their members to afford the opportunity to review processes and then implement better ideas.

When we come to the Military Drill World, there is plenty to learn that has not been taught and ways of teaching that have not been used. But we encounter the mindset of, “The military (collectively) has been around for over 200 years! We are doing just fine, thank you.” The fact is that many soloists, JROTC, ROTC and even CAP, Sea Cadets and other units are not “just fine” and need differing levels of help in the form of education and guidance. Still, many are too stubborn to accept constructive criticism or seek help.

Service and Military Bias is quite prevalent as well. Service Bias is when a member of one service will not budge on any issue if it comes from outside his/her scope of training. Military Bias is when a service member does not accept any form of training that was not developed or used by the military in general. The education and training of cadets could be advanced quite a bit if only some would understand.

I am not equating anyone or any group to being monkeys. The video only shows the progress and results of a scientific study.

The military, at the end of WWII, fostered the pageantry arts, drum and bugle corps and marching bands, which led to indoor color guard as well and other arts. An issue arose in the early 1970s regarding the control that the military (veteran organizations) had over competitions and judging. You see, those involved in the pageantry arts who did not have that military background- and even a few who did- began to take their groups into new levels of performance which left the rigid rules of the military behind – though the foundational training remained and was added to. For decades the foundation was laid by the military men and women and they needed to let these organizations grow and learn on their own and even grow and learn with them, but the veterans didn’t grow and learn. Eventually, those who were staffing the groups in the pageantry arts did not deal with the military men and women. The military roots are still held in high regard and many lessons are still taught today, but they are mixed with the higher-level education and training that is seen in high school marching bands and drum corps across the USA and even around the world as the education and training began spreading in the early 1980s.

The point is, being open to new ideas- or at least ideas that are new to you- is a good thing. If these ideas work well, everyone wins. If these ideas do not seem to work for your organization, then there is nothing lost as you at least tried.

“That’s the way we’ve always done it,” is such a horrible statement to hear, don’t be the one to say it.

The Air Force Baser Honor Guard Badge

The Base Honor Guard (BHG) Badge, known as the “Cookie” is a device that only Active Duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard Airmen wear when they are assigned to a BHG. Not even retirees can wear it unless they are actively working with a BHG.

I went through two weeks of honor guard training many years ago (1990) when I was stationed at Davis-Monthan AFB in Tucson, AZ. I then spent about fourteen of my twenty years of Active Duty on several BHGs around the globe and even attended Air Force Honor Guard training in Washington DC in 2002. I had to meet certain criteria for award of my BHG Cookie as all Airmen have to. In a personal way, the Cookie is “my” badge and all Airmen who have gone through the training and qualified can call it “my badge” as well.

BHG PictureThe picture at right is of a Spangdahlem Air Base (Germany) Honor Guard presenting the colors at St. Mihiel WWI American Military Cemetery in France in 2010, five years after I retired. I am the NCT and my friends and colleagues are with me. We are all wearing our uniform accouterments (which color bearers no longer wear) including our Cookies. You can see them on our left breast pockets of our blouses. I actually trained the two guards and knew they were qualified to wear their BHG Cookies.

What does BHG training entail so that a graduate of the training is then awarded and authorized to wear the Cookie? The training last at least 40 hours and consists of:

  1. What we call Standing Manual
  2. Colors
  3. Firing party
  4. Pall Bearers (including 2- and 6-man* Flag Fold) *”man” means position.

There are also small bases in the Air Force, mostly overseas, that are not authorized a BHG, but have what is called a Base Color Guard that is aligned under a BHG (the Spangdahlem BHG has at least one BCC at a location in Belgium). A BCC, is a small unit that is not authorized to wear the complete BHG uniform, but a variation of the standard AF uniform with the BHG aiguillette and Cookie. Any Airman assigned to either of these two units, who has gone through the training and qualified, may then wear the BHG Cookie on their BHG or BCC uniform. When they are assigned to the BHG, but not on rotation and are in blues, they may also wear the Cookie. When not assigned to a BHG, an Airman may not wear the Cookie- which is why I do not wear mine.

JROTC cadets wearing BHG CookieWhat is quite troubling to me is seeing Air Force Junior ROTC cadets wearing “my” badge. This is absolutely inexcusable with some equating it to Stolen Valor. I don’t know if I would go that far, but I have a very stern opinion about the wear of my badge by high school cadets.

Click here to see that I have dealt with this before and the picture at left, above, is what started it. The team finally realized after much discussion back and forth that they had absolutely no authority whatsoever to wear the Cookie.

Cadet BHG Cookie - CopyThe cadet at right chose to block another cadet on Instagram who was trying to communicate to her that the Cookie that she has on her uniform is not authorized for cadets to wear. Many cadets, possibly out of arrogance, do not want to listen to anyone who says that what they are doing could possibly be wrong.

What is “Readability”?

1e6497f5-c07b-41de-93a5-a17f0bff64ca.jpgReadability describes something that we can easily read. We get that. When we pick up a newspaper or look at a magazine article, we find it easy to read and comprehend, in general. We can read a master’s degree thesis and find complex words, phrases and sentence structure. On the other hand, we can look at a child’s first paper and see that it is very difficult to read and not just because of the child’s inability to draw the letters well. The same goes for a visual performance.

The three types of drill in the military are, regulation (RD), ceremonial (CD) and exhibition (XD). All require readability, but XD is where it comes into play since this type of drill is strictly performance-based. For ease of explanation, I will talk about RD, but it can be applied to CD and XD.

It’s about Communication 
Take a look at the picture above. Notice the stripe on the skirt/trouser leg, cover (hat) and the white gloves. These make certain movements and positions stand out. Look at the hand positions, leg angles and the height of the feet. We see mostly the same positions with a small variation here and there. This is fairly clear communication or, readability. This means we can see what the team is doing and we can understand and appreciate it. This is a picture of one moment in time. Now let’s use our imagination.

Envision yourself executing the following sequence: you execute a Right Face and let your hands swing out a little as you use your shoulders to help you (a common new Driller move). Your shoulders and hands moving create movement that hinders communication, clarity and sharpness.

Now, envision this: you are at Port Arms going to Order. You reach up with your right hand, grasp the rifle to pull it down and as you let go with your left, your left drifts over to your left side and then moves to the rifle muzzle. You then rest the rifle on the deck and cut your left to your side to Attention. That indecisive left arm movement creates confusion as to where it should go creating confusion.

Imagine you are executing the 15-Count Manual, Arms sequence. Imagine that your hands never reach your sides when you are at either shoulder, but stop a few inches away from your trouser seam. This means you are not completing each position’s movements like you should. This completely blurs clarity and greatly hinders communication. This usually happens when the Driller is concentrating on completing the sequence in order near the beginning of learning the manual of arms.

And now, if you are an exhibition Driller, imagine not completing moves or positions, as described above for the 15-Count Manual. This is very common for Drillers as they progress.

You create clear communication by completing moves and by executing movements sharply. It isn’t simple at first because you have multiple responsibilities* going on at the same time. Eventually though, as you progress, you learn to balance those responsibilities and create effective drill.

*Multiple Responsibilities are what you have to consider all at the same time, while performing: marching with your feet straight while at attention, using proper arm swing, staying aligned to the front and side, staying in step, executing movements at the right time, etc.

Post High School Exhibition Drill

Post High School DrillUntil about 2005, there were not very many post-high school soloists, or at least high school graduates who loved to spin a rifle and could compete or perform in public. Nothing really existed for Drillers except for New Guard America (NGA) which began in the 1990s under the direction of my college friend, Constantine Wilson. Other than that, nothing really existed.

That is until 2007/8. Michael, a friend of mine for several years now, had an idea to host the first independent exhibition drill competition for solo and tandem Drillers, the birth of the New York Drill Competition (NYDC). The first NYDC had the competitors judging each other with score sheets developed by me. The next few years saw me flying in to help judge with others sing updated World Drill Association score sheets that I was refining. Those years also saw the creation of the Texas Drill Competition (TXDC), North Carolina Drill Competition (NCDC)- both of which I judged, and the Florida Drill Competition (FLDC). The only consistent online competition has been the Michigan Online Drill Competition (MIODC, look it up on Facebook) which I have been thrilled to judge since its inception.

Also in 2007 was the Isis World Drill Championships (“Isis” has since been removed), sponsored by Sports Network International. And let’s not forget about NGA’s Pro America competition, but this competition was blade-only and you had to go through an audition.

While competitions were burgeoning many high school Drillers who loved to drill finally saw some hope of continuing with their passion for armed exhibition drill once they graduated.

How to “Break Into” Post-High School Drill
There are no secrets. It’s about practicing and practicing until you have the ability to compete at the professional level. You will also want to consider drilling with a bayonet. I am not one of those who says that drill without a bayonet isn’t “real”- not that anyone really says that but there are a few purists out there who do not like facsimile rifles or, for that matter, drilling stub (without a bayonet).

Bladed Drill
Read about the DrillMaster Bayonet here. Before you even think about going bladed:

  • You really should be at least 16- 18 years old is even better.
  • You need to have several years (at least four years is a good rule of thumb) of exhibition drill under your belt.

Your next step is to then go to a competition. You may have to travel, but it will be worth it to meet other Drillers, face time (not the app) is the perfect way to help you get known by others. Now repeat what I wrote: practice and practice and then compete. When you need feedback on your performance, other Drillers are usually more than happy to give advice since many want to see our activity grow. And there is always me, I offer DrillMaster Audio Performance Critiques (an MP3 of my comments based on the World Drill Association Adjudication system which you can download) for performances and advice about moves and short sequences.