Tag Archives: OTC

What is Authorized When Presenting the Colors?

 

Colors Posting Process

Question: I need information for a color guard presentation when other music is played instead of the National Anthem or when the Pledge of Allegiance is recited.

Answer: The only music should be the National Anthem. The Pledge is the only replacement for the Anthem. No other music is authorized. If a band is present and the occasion warrants, the band may play a military march as the team advances to post the colors. A recording can be a substitute, but most often is a poor substitute. To have some kind of music playing for whatever reason as the color team advances and departs is not appropriate. Music is not mandatory. Color teams advance to present and post the colors in silence all of the time.

The color team (color guard) sequence goes like this:

  1. Five minutes before the ceremony, the color team forms up in an out-of-the-way location inside the room or, if there isn’t room for them, outside of the room, near the doorway.
  2. The announcer/master of ceremonies should say something like, “Ladies and gentlemen, please rise for the presentation (or posting*) of the colors.”
  3. On that cue, the color team commander calls the team to attention, port arms and gives forward march.
  4. The team comes to center in front of and facing the audience and the commander gives Present, ARMS.
  5. On that cue, the band, National Anthem is played or sung or the Pledge of Allegiance is recited by all present.
  6. The color team commander gives Order, ARMS and the team either posts the colors or departs.

*There is a difference, see the next question.

Color Team Center Aisle Post-Present w-Step Exit
Center Aisle Presentation

Question: Can you present colors indoors when there is already flags posted on a stage?

Answer: Yes! In the honor guard world, it is called a “Show-N-Go”. The reason for only presenting the colors and not posting could be, the event is not formal, the position of the posted colors is awkward, or time will not allow for the posting sequence.

A Show-N-Go is only accomplished when another set of colors or at least the American flag is pre-posted.

Color Team Post-Present and Exit

 

Images from, The Honor Guard Manual. For complete information on the different acceptable ways of how to present/post the colors and the different ways for the color team to depart, see the manual.

Exhibition Drill Injuries

Before we begin: I am not a medical doctor, nor do I play one in this book (or TV or anywhere else). This article is not a substitute for obtaining professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Minor InjuryNow, on to the article.

Many exhibition Drillers (you are not an “exhibitionist” unless you remove your clothing while spinning the rifle) have spent some time dealing with an injury or six.

At your JROTC unit, it is a very good idea to have a first aid kit available during practice. At home, it would be a good to have the same thing or something similar.

Repetitive Use Strains
Doing the same move over and over is the way to finally get it perfected and the best way to strain certain muscles and tendons.

When you have a strain, remember “RICE”: Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. Ibuprofen or natural supplements to reduce swelling is also a good step to take.

Click here to read a great article about Repetitive Strain Injury. At the site, Clay Scott, explains everything you need to know, including pictures of two very helpful stretches.

Cuts
Prevention is the key here, but you will still receive an abrasion or cut eventually. Removing both sights and the stacking swivel from your rifle is going to help to significantly reduce opportunities for the rifle parts to cut you.

Cuts still may happen, especially if you drill bladed (Got Bayonet?). If receive a minor cut, clean the wound and cover it with a bandage that has a small amount of tea tree oil or honey (must be real, not the processed junk) on it.

Click here to read about some excellent natural methods to treat cuts and abrasions.

The JROTC “Feeder” Program

Randolph-Macon Academy
Randolph-Macon Academy

If your JROTC unit does not have a plan on how to recruit at the local elementary schools that feed your high school, then you need to implement a strategy this school year!

JROTC programs need cadets, that we know. If 8th-grade students are unaware of the benefits of JROTC (leadership, organization skills, drill team, etc.), then those students will probably not sign up for JROTC. One of my favorite sayings is, “Education is key!” Applying that phrase to this situation means that you, as a cadet, can help ensure that 8th-graders are aware of JROTC and how it can impact their life whether they join the military or not. But, how do you do this? I’m glad you asked.

Self-promotion is a leadership and political skill that is critical to master in order to navigate the realities of the workplace and position you for success.”
― Bonnie Marcus

Promotion, Promotion, Promotion
I am not talking about telling everyone how wonderful you are or how amazing your units is. That is not the point. The point is to help students understand how much fun they can have and all of the different things they can learn just by being in the program.

Create a team that has can visit different places (schools, community events) that sets up a table with flyers with information and a tri-fold display board complete with pictures of cadets in all of the different activities.

During the high school open house, ensure that the PT, drill and rocketry teams all get a chance to show off their skills. Have the color guard present the colors to begin the night.

  • Raiders– run to the elementary school and do PT with the students.
  • Drill Team and Color Guard– perform at the school. March in as many parades as possible.
  • Reveille or Retreat– perform for the cadets in all of the different ways that you can.

Note: You must ensure students and their parents are fully aware that JROTC does not come with a commitment to the military. Junior ROTC is a citizen building program only, about 14% (it varies slightly by service) of cadets join the military either by directly enlisting or by attending college and commissioning.

Your JROTC unit needs to be prepared and the Public Affairs cadet(s) should put all of this into motion in conjunction with the team commanders. Educate the incoming students and the people living near the school by putting your best foot forward.

Saint Louis High AJROTC in Trouble?

Yes, another JROTC unit is in serious trouble. This time it seems to be a burocratic position with a financial excuse, but no one really knows exactly . (Also read: The Hatred of JROTC.)

Cadets who attended JROTC units around the world can provide anecdotal evidence as to how the program and moreover, the instructors, played a key role in learning life lessons. We, in the Military Drill World, know what it’s all about: citizenship, leadership, followership, accountability, teamwork and a myriad of other qualities that cadets learn from just attending classes or stepping up and volunteering for the extra-curricular activities: drill team, color guard, Raiders, rocketry, PT, academics, etc. Just like the music programs under attack, JROTC is irreplaceable.

Saint Louis CrusadersWhile Mission High Schools AJROTC unit had a problem with finding instructors, the Saint Louis Crusader Battalion of Honolulu, Hawaii is in danger of closing supposedly due to funds. Two former cadets set up a Facebook page to help organize the fight against the shutdown and are urging everyone to use the hashtag, ‪#‎SaveSLSBattion‬.

SaintLouis High AJROTC instructors, First Sergeant Akuna and Chief Warrant Officer Philips, have been taking freshman kids and turning them into young men and women for many years now.

The following is what I have been able to obtain from one of the cadets (C/SFC Dillon Wong):

“The cadets were informed of the cut on July 8th by Chief Philips when he sent out an email of our newest [school board] president’s, Dr. Glen Mederios, letter. The letter informed us that the JROTC program was being replaced by a Civil Air Patrol program because it was significantly cheaper. The next day, July 9, some of the cadets from the ranger platoon went to the school to see if we could save the program. When we arrived, 1SG was already starting to clean out the battalion of all of its contents. He explained to us what had happened and that he would be forced to retire. Our cadet commander, Jared Castaneda was able to arrange a meeting with Dr. Mederios that day so, Jared, our S5 assistant, Aaron Hasimoto, and I went to meet with our president.

“In the meeting we asked several questions. The most important was Jared asking why we were informed so late in the summer. The response of Dr. Mederios shocked us all. His exact words were, ‘Well, the reason for the late notice is that, if I informed the parents and the teachers of this cut earlier, it would give hope to trying to raise the money. When looking at these numbers, you can see it is a hopeless effort.’ Naturally our next question was how much money did the program cost. At first, he told us that the JROTC program costs over $200,000 dollars. Then he changed it to $175,000. He then said CAP would costmuch less, just $25,000. The only concern I have about this is that CAP is a government-funded cadet program with volunteers as instructors. This came straight from our Dr. Mederios and told us that he is only paying them so that they come to Saint Louis every day after school with no exceptions.

“After our meeting we informed the rest of the cadets who came and most of them were worried about joining CAP or joining the Punahou Battalion. I thought that this is the wrong way to go and that saving the battalion is possible. Cadet Captain Erica Bantolina and Cadet Sergeant Maybelle Lee, my two good friends, shared my thoughts and together we started this cause. Our first action was creating the Facebook page to first see if people would be interested in helping us. After about 200 likes, we decided to go through with this. We originally posted that the cost of saving the program was $175,000 but then removed it after being called by Chief Philips saying that the amount was incorrect.

“Our next action was finding a person who would be our financial advisor and see if they could talk to Dr. Mederios. We were able to contact the father of an alumni from the JROTC program who is another good friend of ours. Without hesitation, he agreed and worked vigorously to set up a meeting. We also contacted the former board president, Judge Kirimitsu, since he encouraged and supported our program throughout his years. They met with Dr. Mederios yesterday, July 10th, and were able to get the go-ahead to collect the money. We also found out that the actual cost to keep the program alive was $90,000.

“We have two major donors ready to give us money once we have an account set up so that we do not run into any legal problems. Our first donor is a 2010 alumni named Dee Soliman who was the BC (Battalion Commander, a cadet) for the JROTC program. He has created an account on gofundme.com to collect money. I contacted him and he has given us his full consent of overseeing the account and receiving the money once he has reached his quota of 10,000 dollars. Our second donor is Eugene Hong who was also a program alumnus. The reason he is so passionate of saving this program is because his senior year was 1SG Akuna’s first year of service at the school. I have already informed him that we cannot accept any money until we have an account set up. I plan on contacting the Saint Louis Alumni Association and another major donor, Clarence TC Ching, who recently gave a generous donation to construct our new schol gym.

“This is where we stand now and plan on collecting the money by next week. We do not want to post anything on our page about the actual amount of 90,000 dollars and that we were given the right to collect the money because we do not want people asking us where to send the money. Once we set up a money collecting account, we will release the information.

“Thank you again for giving us the time out of you day to listen to our situation, Mr. Marshall, you do not know how much this means to us.”